Things 3 is tremendous, and I must confess that I’ve fully switched to it.

A bit of background: I had used Things 1 as my first high-powered to-do list (after first experimenting with Remember The Milk). But it languished, especially in terms of sync, and it didn’t have time-based deadlines. So I switched to OmniFocus. OmniFocus is best in class, really powerful and thoughtful. But some of OmniFocus’ recent power user implementations have felt odd to me – I don’t need TaskPaper support every time I copy and paste, for example. OmniFocus was oddly between a task manager and a project manager.

Although OmniFocus is thoroughly Mac-like, powerful, and intuitive, I missed the clear, lovely Things in its earlier versions. With Things 3, the stark beauty is only enhanced, with inviting fonts, titles, and clarity. (It feels very inspired by iOS 10’s Music app, with large, clear titles and sections.) I like the Today view, and I like the ease of seeing everything. Lists and items pop onscreen and offscreen in a really pleasing way that clearly communicates what is happening. Things has had a powerful sync for some years, but I hadn’t really experimented with it until Things 3.

I do sometimes miss the Review tab of OmniFocus, but it’s really not necessary. If you want to review, then review, or set an appointment or recurring event and go through everything. Things forces you to keep it simple, which is always a challenge for a kind of software that naturally invites complexity.

Use whatever works for you – Apple’s Reminders is great, and OmniFocus is awesome. But Things pops in a way that feels very contemporary, leaving OmniFocus feeling a bit stale.

Cheers to Things 3!

Posted
AuthorKevin Taylor

I just finished a delightful summer read: A Gentleman in Moscow. Amor Towles evokes a culture in change, as a Russian aristocrat sees his world change as a result of the Bolshevik Revolution. The Count is hilarious and poignant with his quirks, sense of humor, and careful manners, and the book itself is amusing with its occasional footnotes and author's self-conscious foreshadowings. The plot finds clever ways to move forward, despite Count Rostov's limited mobility (he must stay in the Hotel Metropol under house arrest, due to his being an aristocrat). The book's terrific characters and setting play off the backdrop of thirty years of pivotal Russian history, and it raises questions of circumstance and cultural change. A New York Times review is here, and my Amazon Associates link is below.

A Gentleman in Moscow: A Novel
$16.17
By Amor Towles
Posted
AuthorKevin Taylor

Ryan and I explore themes of horror, especially in Stephen King and movies, and ask, does it ever go too far? And how does it all relate to narrative and theology?

Available below, on iTunes, and through your favorite podcast player.

Posted
AuthorKevin Taylor

I made a video! Here's a screencast on how I use Turnitin for grading and plagiarism checking.

Posted
AuthorKevin Taylor

There are two kinds of apocalypse. One is the question of survival in which one inevitably loses. Night of the Living Dead and Cormac McCarthy’s The Road are in this category. Here one attempts to survive, but fails. We see protagonists struggle against impossible odds that ultimately overwhelm them.

Posted
AuthorKevin Taylor

Another great discussion with Ryan Reeves. Topics include academic fads, hotels and traveling, doing voices and channeling Karl Barth, and the oddity of the "van Gogh effect."

Posted
AuthorKevin Taylor